Tuesday, September 18, 2018

A few random thoughts on BTS canceling the Akimoto "Bird" collaboration

It’s been a long while since I was involved in a fandom as large and active as BTS. I’d forgotten both the good--large amounts of content--and bad--large amounts of drama--involved. There is another layer of difficulty in dealing with the BTS fandom in that with BTS’s sudden growth in popularity in the English-speaking world there are suddenly large numbers of fangirls falling for BTS who have absolutely no understanding or knowledge of the cultural context in which BTS exists.

What I mean is this: there are suddenly a lot of well meaning English-speaking fangirls coming from fandoms like One Direction who simply do not understand anything about Korean history or culture let alone the complicated web of relationships that exists between the entertainment industry, politics, and the fans. And worse, they don’t even know that there are things they don’t know.

On the one hand, no, you really don’t need to know anything about Korea to appreciate a fun dance performance and a bunch of cute guys being charming.

On the other hand, when a huge controversy erupts in the Korean fandom about lyrics to a new Japanese single written by Akimoto Yasushi, you really do need to understand what’s happening or it gets spread to the English language press in the most vapid of terms: i.e. “concerns about past misogyny”.

My immediate reaction seeing that is, you’ve got to be kidding me. The idea that BTS’s management in Japan wouldn’t know that Akimoto--one of the most famous men in Japanese show business and the guy behind such classic girl group songs as the lingerie slumber party themed “Heavy Rotation”--may have some issues with “misogyny” is ridiculous. Of course he has issues with misogyny. SHOW BUSINESS HAS ISSUES WITH MISOGYNY!

I’m not excusing Akimoto’s lingerie parties but I also don’t think it’s helpful to women's causes to use misogyny so casually as an excuse for a business decision in this way. Why pick on Akimoto specifically and not, for example, the rampant misogyny in the Korean music business or, for that matter, the American music business? I mean BTS just did a collaboration with Nicki Minaj and for my money by using her sexuality as a promotional tool she encourages just as many negative stereotypes about women as AKB48 does.

Misogyny is serious and it's endemic in show business (as well as everywhere else in modern life).

So, here’s what American fans need to understand: it’s not about us and it's not about our ideas of "social justice".

Akimoto is a hugely powerful figure in Japanese show business and this deal falling through will probably have some negative consequences in the Japanese market. (How big, I don’t know but I would guess they’re going to get frozen out of some television promotions and possibly the end of the year music shows.)

BTS didn’t tank a new single with lyrics written by a hugely influential and legendary songwriter because somebody showed them “Heavy Rotation” and they thought it was sexist. This was a calculated decision stemming from the negative reaction from the Korean fanbase that is rooted in Akimoto’s nationalist political leanings.

Folks, Korea has a long and difficult relationship with Japan. Korea is still extremely bitter about the years of colonization, among other things. I mean, Japanese music was literally banned in Korea until fairly recently.

But K-Pop can’t ignore Japan, considering it makes up a considerable percentage of their export market for entertainment.

But Japan doesn’t need K-Pop like other markets need K-Pop, which is why Korean idol groups have to go out of their way to try and appeal to the market there, releasing not only Japanese language versions of their Korean songs but Japanese songs meant to appeal to mainstream Japanese pop tastes.

BTS are no different.

Or are they?

I still need to write up my concert experience in Seoul but one thing that really stood out to me was the large number of foreign fans in attendance. I’m not talking about Americans or Europeans but Japanese, Chinese, and Southeast Asian fans. I’d guess that at least ⅓ of the fans in attendance were not from Korea, which explains why the stadium announcements were given in both Korean and Japanese.

My impression is that Japanese fans of K-Pop groups like BTS have negative feelings towards Japanese show business and the men with sleazy images like Akimoto (or Johnny Kitagawa) who run things behind-the-scenes. Is Korean show business different? I mean, not really, but I think it’s easier to pick and choose what you pay attention to when it’s all in a foreign language. American and European fans of East Asian entertainment act the same way.

BTS’s management miscalculated with the Akimoto collaboration. They were aiming for a link-up with the mainstream Japanese public but didn’t realize that a lot of their Japanese fans enjoy BTS because they’re not mainstream Japanese show business. Add to that the outrage from Korean fans over Akimoto’s nationalist reputation and it makes more sense to cancel the collaboration than risk further backlash.

I’ll be honest though: I am disappointed. I’m not a huge fan of AKB48 or of Akimoto himself but he is a great lyricist and one with ties stretching back to the glory days of Showa era J-Pop.

I understand and support the decision from BTS’s point of view but the Japanese single will now only feature remixes and Japanese versions of songs I’m not overly fond of.

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