Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Tuesday Post!! Happy Thalaivaa Day to you all!

GOOD MORNING!!!

Tomorrow is Raksha Bandhan (yes?) and Indian Express has a photo gallery of famous Bollywood siblings! I'll have to find a nice picture of my brother and sister and I to post tomorrow.

India Today reflects on the lack of brother-sister bond in films today.

"Comparatively, one sees less of the sister in contemporary cinema as the brother-sister bond is considered a box office liability at a time when commercialism has overruled social responsibility from current scripts," Ausaja told IANS.


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Randeep Hooda will try to keep up with Naseeruddin Shah and Ratna Pathak Shah in Coffin Maker. Good luck with that, buddy. (Links to TOI press release.)

Filmfare has a glamour shot of Naseer from the film. It's kind of fun! (In that cranky, morbid Naseer-ssab way!)

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This is an odd little story--Sidharth Malhotra sends a cease and desist letter to two kids running a fansite. Obviously I don't think there is anything wrong with fanclubs but if they were selling merchandise based on his name (as the screencap of their site seems to indicate) then that is crossing a line.

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Did Sanjay Dutt apply for parole or was it just a slow news day?

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From the "did I just read that" file comes this book review of the Great Tamasha. I was reading the New York Times Book Review supplement--like I do every Monday at work--and I came across this little gem:

At a film shoot in Kashmir, a Bollywood leading lady originally from Queens, with a name like a Bond girl, Nargis Fakhri, is literally spoon-fed by an assistant to protect the wet henna on her hands. “Dude, it’s gross,” she says, not about the mutton curry placed in her mouth as she is being interviewed, but of her first impressions of Mumbai. “I was, like, standing looking out my hotel window thinking: ‘You know what? This is gross.’ ”

So, the author was on set of Rock Star? I'm kind of curious to see what other pearls of wisdom spill from the lips of our Manic Pixie Bollywood Girl.

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I've been enjoying the hoopla surrounding Madras Cafe. Apparently now the rumor is that part of the story comes from the assassination of Rajiv Gandhi.

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Photos of the celebrations for Thalaivaa's release!!

Celebration inside the theater! I only wish I could join in. I really enjoyed the film and I'm glad all the Vijay fans in Tamil Nadu can, too! Ah! I want to watch it again!


2 comments:

Moimeme said...

Re the brother-sister relationship in films, nowadays, the hero and heroine are not even shown to have parents influencing their lives, forget about siblings. :) And yet in real life, even for the rich and famous, parents definitely have a vast influence on their adult children's lives, whether it's via the star kid syndrome or the monitoring of their offspring's romances, a la Rishi Kapoor. Heck, Abhishek Bachchan was pretty much missing as either an expectant or actual father in all the hoopla about Aishwarya's pregnancy. The announcement was made by Amitabh, and it was he who carried the baby out of the hospital. And many people lauded this as proof of the Bachchans' "traditional values." :) So all I'm saying is, when the family relationships continue to be so important in real lives, why are they absent in films? I think because even the "modern, realistic" films are escapist fantasies for the urban crowd who dreams of being free of all family shackles.

The article you link mentions Garv among other films. It's interesting that Garv, as well as another Salman film, Bandhan, is *all about* the brother-sister relationship, and for which it is not a side plot (This is especially true in the case of Bandhan). Both films were hits, too, showing that there is an audience appetite for this kind of thing. There was also Om Jagdish Hari, which was about the relationship between brothers.

Finally, I don't think we need to have too much nostalgia for the films of the past where the hero's sister was always present, as most of the time, her role was to get raped so the hero could take revenge on the villain.

Re Siddharth Malhotra, apparently he sued his "fans" because they not only started a fan club, but were selling merchandise on their website which had ostensibly been signed by him (not true). From comments on another forum referring to an unnamed other article, the fans supposedly also hacked Siddharth's Facebook account to steal pictures he had posted there and posted them on their own website. So it's hardly a black and white issue.

Moimeme said...

Sorry, that film above was supposed to be Om Jai Jagdish, *not* Om Jagdish Hari.

Note from Filmi Girl:

I love Bollywood - and all the ridiculous things that happen in Bollywood - but it doesn't mean that I can't occasionally make fun of various celebrities and films.

If you don't like my sense of humor, please just move on by - Trolls are not appreciated and nasty comments will be deleted.

xoxo Filmi Girl