Thursday, May 23, 2013

Cannes Day 8-9!

IT'S THE MOMENT WE'VE ALL BEEN WAITING FOR!

AMEESHA PATEL, ladies and gents! Here she is in the (undead) flesh, straight from the sets of Go Goa Gone. That pancake make-up is so thick, it looks like the make-up artist thought she would be starring in a 1960s film opposite Mehmood instead of walking the red carpet at Cannes.

I'm also a little disappointed at her dress. I was hoping for something a bit more fun from Ameesha but I suppose Sherlyn Chopra already cornered the market on see-through dresses.

And now for actual film reports...


Variety joins the queue of Western outlets lining up to, um, "felicitate" Anurag Kashyap.

His “No Smoking” had niche box office success in 2007.

HAAAAAA! I actually really enjoyed the film but to call it's box office success "niche" is like saying America has had "niche" military success in Iraq.

That's some good felicitation right there. Mmm... mmm...

A scathing review for Bombay Talkies from The Hollywood Reporter. Deborah Young rips into the film with glee:

Maybe the most impressive thing about this uneven film is its interminable end credits, which give audiences a clue about the manpower that goes into making Hindi films today.

Oh, snap!

A smart interview with producer Guneet Monga:

(Also, hey look! A LADY! And she's not in a bikini!)

When the Hollywood studios first produced Indian films, they were quite wide eyed. But now they are getting more real. Every non-English speaking country has its own film genre. India is classified as Bollywood but it is not really a genre since it is quite difficult to define it... By comparison, Hong Kong action films are a genre as are Japanese horror films or Chinese historical martial arts epics. So when the studios first came to India and said that they wanted Bollywood, there was no clarity.

And another with Lunch Box director Ritesh Batra:

THR: What kind of cinema have you been inspired by?

Batra: Its a diverse bunch which includes Louis Malle, Ingrid Bergman, Satyajit Ray and Abbas Kiarostami and many more. Iranian cinema is very interesting because it is honest, specific and local to Iran - because it is local, it becomes universal and can travel. This can develop in India too when we tap into that kind of sensibility. What is mostly happening in India is that we are self-conscious and trying to be something we are not – such as trying to be Tarantino-esque. Something original and organic comes after you invest in yourself and discover your voice.

3 comments:

Moimeme said...

In fairness (pun unintended!) to Ameesha, I think you should also post her photo from the portrait session of Shortcut Romeo (her film that she is promoting at Cannes) where she looked lovely with a tasteful lehnga and subdued makeup.

http://www.pinkvilla.com/entertainment/event/cannes-2013-ameesha-patel-shortcut-romeo-portrait-session

eliza bennet said...

She looks about fifty years old in the these pics.

Janeheiress said...

Re: Ritesh Batra, I think he meant Ingmar Bergman. Either he doesn't know his own sources (which I doubt), or that is some shoddy reporting.

Note from Filmi Girl:

I love Bollywood - and all the ridiculous things that happen in Bollywood - but it doesn't mean that I can't occasionally make fun of various celebrities and films.

If you don't like my sense of humor, please just move on by - Trolls are not appreciated and nasty comments will be deleted.

xoxo Filmi Girl